Work with us

    Want to intern with us?

    Cox Media Group - Houston has opportunities for summer internships in the Radio Marketing Department open to juniors and seniors attending college, university, trade and/or technical school.  Click to get the details.

     

    Great Shows

    A wonderful restored barn from the the 1840s provides fabulous acoustics at this Woodlands music venue, an intimate forum for great artists. See who's coming next.

    Storytime

    It's Uncle Dan Gallo's Storytime. If you missed this morning's storytime, don't fear, we have it here!

    Uncle Guido

    Uncle Guido is here - on demand. Several times a week we will update the Uncle Guido Podcast so check back often!

    Megaphone Newsreel

    Its the Megaphone Newsreel podcast from the Dan Gallo Morning show. Check back often as we update several time per week.

    Events

    Entertainment News

    Adam Levine will always miss his mentee Christina Grimmie.

    On Tuesday night, Levine and his current team on “The Voice,” Jesse Larson, Lilli Passero and Mark Isaiah, performed the Beatles hit “Hey Jude” in Grimmie’s honor.

    >> Watch the video here

    Before taking the stage, Levine addressed Grimmie’s parents and brother Marcus in the audience.

    “I loved her so much,” he started. “I miss her. It’s unfair that’s she’s not here. And, we’re going to sing her a little song tonight and I am going to sing every word to her in her honor. Thank you guys for being here. Christina, we love you.”

    >> Read more trending news

    Team Adam then took the stage for a stunning and emotional performance. By the end of the performance, the audience and fellow coaches were on their feet applauding the number.

    After the performance, Levine and host Carson Daly announced a new foundation that has been set up in her honor.

    The foundation will work to provide assistance – both emotional and financial – for families and individuals who suffer from the devastating effects of gun violence and will support families facing breast cancer diagnosis.

    Grimmie was killed in June 2016 after a man approached her after a concert in Orlando, Florida, and shot her. She was 22 years old. Levine was her coach on season 6 of “The Voice” and reportedly paid for her funeral.

    The worst thing that ever happened to ESPN was the success of PTI.

    >> READ MORE at Marcus Hartman’s “Cus Words Blog

    Shortly after Pardon The Interruption debuted in October 2001, the network set about trying to replicate it on every other show on the network.

    That has proven to be a disaster because nobody in Bristol gets the debate isn’t what makes that show great, it’s the debaters.

    Tony Kornheiser and Michal Wilbon, not just colleagues but friends who genuinely seem to love arguing with each other about things they’ve actually put some thought into, have a unique rapport that can’t be copied easily.

    And yet more than 15 years later, the people running ESPN continue to try in vain.

    Collateral damage in this war against people who want good content has been mounting for years, and Wednesday was one of the worst as the company parted ways with a bunch of people who actually do good work and produce things worth consuming (mostly for their website) in an effort to offset financial losses wrought by spending more than they can afford on the rights to broadcast live sports.

    If you wondered if the product on ESPN was ever going to get better, the answer is now clear.

    For the most part, it appears ESPN kept the carnival barkers while cutting many of the people who actually gather the information people like Stephen A. Smith hyperventilate about.

    >> Read more trending news

    There’s a theory out there that mixing in too many liberal political messages has hurt the network’s bottom line, but I’m not sure I buy that. Of course, I don’t watch it enough to know just how liberal those messages are. It could be true. It’s probably at least a small factor.

    I can’t imagine skewing in one direction politically helps, and I believe the whole stick to sports thing is actually good advice most of the time.

    Not that everyone isn’t entitled to their opinion and encouraged to share it whenever they want, but there are a lot of sports fans who really don’t want political commentary in their sports.

    And that’s a very fair request, at least 99 percent of the time. There are plenty of sources for news, politics and whatever else, but ESPN has the market cornered on live sports. So feel free to be obstinate, but don’t be surprised if there are consequences. 

    Responding to consumer demand is important in any business, but ESPN hasn’t made a habit of that lately.

    As often as they take a former athlete off the street and throw him or her into the studio – or worse yet, onto a broadcast – with no experience and much to learn about how to actually express themselves in an informative and entertaining manner, it’s clear ESPN doesn’t care about the quality of what it puts out there.

    So at this point I assume if ESPN is having ratings problems (they are), it’s mostly because their product sucks.

    I assume they’re cutting people from their website because it doesn’t generate much revenue in the grand scheme of things. The people who have run the network so poorly probably also figure whatever money the web does bring in can probably be maintained mostly by posting viral clips from their terrible sports opinion shows anyway.

    Maybe I’m making a lot of assumptions for someone who gave up on ESPN long ago, but actually watching ESPN didn’t used to be essential in appreciating it.

    I grew up without cable, but I knew all about SportsCenter.

    There was no Twitter to make the catchphrases of Dan Patrick, Keith Olbermann, Stuart Scott, et al, go viral as they might today, but ESPN became a cultural icon in the 1990s anyway.

    That was, oddly enough, because they presented sports in a fun and entertaining way. 

    A lot of the good stuff was still there when I finally got cable in 2001 (dorm livin’, baby!), but it didn’t last long.

    Within about three years, I quit watching for the most part (aside from live events and PTI), and nothing since has indicated I’m missing much. Certainly social media gives few endorsements, and neither have I found the few snippets I catch here and there appealing.

    That’s why I keep coming to the same conclusion.

    ESPN is dead and never coming back. Today is just one of the sadder reminders. 

    According to a recent study by Addictions.com, country music mentions drugs more than any other musical genre, with the most-referenced drug being marijuana.

    >> Read more trending news

    Those results may come as a shock to some listeners who assumed that rap or hip-hop music might reference drugs more, but 1.6 percent of all country music surveyed by Addictions.com’s Song Meanings Application Programming Interface (API) references drugs on average, compared to less than 1.3 percent on average in hip-hop music.

    Jazz music came in second place, although the study does not disclose the average percentage.

    But what constitutes a drug reference? And what counts as “country” music for Addictions.com? For starters, alcoholic beverages are not classified as drugs in the study (or else, country music would win this by a landslide). According to the methodology of the study, Addictions.com “scraped song lyrics from Song Meanings API and analyzed drug mentions, what drugs were involved, and how it changed over time, and grouped drug slang words together in their respected drug categories.”

    After going over the data from songs from country, rock, jazz, rap/hip-hop, pop, folk and electronic genres from 1933 until now, the drug references were grouped into seven categories: 

    Pills (which includes all Opiates except Heroin, Benzodiazepines, Sleep medication, and ADHD medication), Heroin, Marijuana, LSD, Cocaine (which includes both crack cocaine and cocaine), Ecstasy (This includes MDMA and molly), and Meth.

    After all that, country music came out on top, with 1.6 percent of all songs studied since 1933 referencing some sort of drug. According to the study, the top three drugs referenced in country music were marijuana, cocaine and methamphetamine. 

    It should be noted that most country songs decry drug consumption (with the exception of alcohol, and, very recently, marijuana). No country artists were mentioned in the study, but artists like Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Old Crow Medicine Show, Jamey Johnson, John Prine and many others have referenced marijuana, pills, cocaine or heroin in their songs as hazardous and not recreational.

    However, once the study results are broken down into the musicians that reference drugs the most, country artists don’t even crack the Top 10. That honor goes to all hip-hop artists, most notably Kottonmouth Kings, Eminem, The Game, Lil’ Wayne and Jay-Z.

    If you want to see just how many country music songs reference drugs, take a listen to the playlist below (though we would never condone the use of recreational drugs).